May 30, 2024  
2023-2024 College Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2023-2024 College Catalog and Student Handbook
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CRMJ 1130 - Introduction to Corrections


Academic Division:

Liberal Arts


Academic Discipline:

Criminal Justice


Assistant Dean: Steve Haynes PhD
3 Credit(s)
This course provides students with an overview of the field of corrections including courts, detention, sentencing, adult institutions, and staffing and personnel issues. This course provides the student with a basic working knowledge of the many diverse aspects of the correctional process with emphasis given to the history and development of corrections, the various types of institutions, the correctional process, correctional treatment, and the role of corrections within the field of criminal justice. This course specifically examines the Ohio Correctional System. UG
3 Lecture Hour(s);
College Wide Outcomes
College-Wide Learning Outcomes Assessments - - How it is met & When it is met
Communication – Written  
Communication – Speech  
Intercultural Knowledge and Competence  
Critical Thinking  
Information Literacy  
Quantitative Literacy  

 



Student Learning Outcomes for Course

1. Discuss and evaluate the evolution of the history of corrections from 2000 BC to the present.

a. Given as a research project, the student will create and submit an historical timeline of the

evolution of corrections

b. Given a worksheet exercise, the student will describe the importance of each historical

event on the timeline they submitted.

c. A multiple choice exam will be given to the student with questions covering each of the

historical correctional events in history

d. (Time: 2 class sessions)

Exam, weekly Discussion Question Worksheets/Exercises/Process Orientated, Research project – Weeks 1, 2

2. Describe the philosophies of deterrence,reform, rehabilitation, and retribution as used in

corrections and analyze the goals of corrections.

a. Given a video, the student will evaluate the scenario in the video and name and describe

the philosophy that fits the scenario

b. Given a worksheet exercise, the student will describe, list, and evaluate the goals of

corrections

c. A multiple choice exam will be given to the student with questions covering each of the

philosophies and goals of corrections

d. (Time: 2 class sessions)

Exam, weekly chapter assignments, discussion question worksheets, video assignment- weeks 3, 4

3. Explain the inmate culture of institutions and illustrate how that culture impacts the

operations of institutional facilities.

a. After watching 2 correctional videos related to the operation of prions,, the student will describe the culture of institutions and illustrate what impact that culture has on the field of corrections

b. A multiple choice and essay exam will be given to the student with questions covering the types of cultures and an a essay question regarding the impact that culture has on the field of corrections

c. (Time: 2 class sessions)

Exam, weekly chapter assignments, discussion question worksheets, video assignment- weeks 5 and 6

4. Analyze local, state, and federal institutions,including architectural design, custody and treatment programs, and types of correctional institutions, jurisdiction and services provided in each.

a. Given a research exercise, the student will conduct research (using valid approved CRJ web-sites) and submit a report that illustrates the differences between local, state, and federal institutions in regards to design, treatment,architectural design, and the jurisdictions they serve.

b. Given a critical thinking exercise that includes “mock cases of clients”, the student will analyze that data and provide a report that determines which type of institution the client should be housed in and what treatment the client would need.

c. (Time: 4 class sessions)

Exam, research exercise, chapter assignments, weekly discussion worksheets- weeks 7, 8, 9

5. Analyze what the pains of imprisonment are that is experienced by the inmate.

a. Given a worksheet exercise, the student will describe, list, and evaluate the pains of imprisonment that inmates experience

b. A multiple choice exam will be given to the student with questions covering the pains of imprisonment

c. (Time: 2 class sessions)

Exam, research exercise, chapter assignments, weekly discussion worksheets- weeks 8-9

6. Compare the concepts of probation and parole and analyze the effectiveness of the different programs within community corrections.

a. Given a research project, the student will determine and submit in writing or in a table the differences and/or similarities of probation and parole.

b. Given a research exercise, the student will conduct research (using valid approved CRJ web-sites) and submit a report that illustrates or describes the different programs available in community corrections.

c. A multiple choice exam will be given to the student with questions covering the types of programs and the differences of probation and parole.

d. (Time: 3 class sessions)

Exam, research exercise, critical thinking exercise – weeks 3-4

7. Demonstrate knowledge of the major constitutional rights and legal issues facing corrections and those under correctional supervision.

a. Given a legal research exercise, the student will present an analysis of the constitutional rights inmates possess as well as providing the case summaries that support those rights.

b. Given a worksheet exercise, the student will describe the current legal issues that are under debate.

c. A multiple choice exam will be given to the student with questions covering the legal rights and constitutional Amendments

d. (Time: 4 class sessions)

Exam, legal research, discussion worksheets, critical thinking exercises – weeks 10-12

8. Analyze the correctional client and identify various special populations (such as race,

gender, sex, mental status) and how the correctional system addresses their needs.

a. Given a critical thinking exercise that includes “mock cases of correctional clients”, the student will determine the needs of the specific clients.

b. Given a research project, the student will research the ODRC’s reports and databases(which must be approved by the professor) and submit a report that lists the types of offenders (including demographics) found in each type of correctional system

c. (Time: 4 class sessions)

Exam, critical thinking exercise, research exercise – weeks 5-6

9. Demonstrate knowledge of different sentencing practices and the impact of those practices.

a. Given a critical thinking exercise that includes “mock cases of correctional clients”, the student will determine the proper sentence for the clients in accordance with the law

b. Given a research project, the student will research ODRC’s reports and create a table that determines the sentencing length that offenders receive based upon the level of felony. Students will use that table to determine the impact those sentences have upon the correctional system

c. (Time: 4 class sessions)

Legal research, critical thinking project, discussion worksheet – weeks 13-14

10. Identify and analyze emerging issues facing corrections.

a. Given a worksheet exercise, the student will describe, list, and analyze the issues in corrections.

b. Students will prepare a discussion/debate over a current issue facing corrections.

c. (Time: 3 class sessions)

Exam, discussion question worksheets, discussion exercise – weeks 15-16

 



Standard Grading Scale
93-100      A

90 - 92      A-

87- 89       B+

83 - 86      B

80 -82       B-

77- 79       C+

73 - 76      C

70 -72       C-

67- 69       D+

63 - 66      D

60 -62       D-

00- 59       F


Statement on Diversity
North Central State College believes that every student is a valued and equal member of the community.*  Every student brings different experiences to the College, and all are important in enriching academic life and developing greater understanding and appreciation of one another. Therefore, NC State College creates an inclusive culture in which students feel comfortable sharing their experiences. Discrimination and prejudice have no place on the campus, and the College takes any complaint in this regard seriously. Students encountering aspects of the instruction that result in barriers to their sense of being included and respected should contact the instructor, assistant dean, or dean without fear of reprisal. 

*Inclusive of race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, national origin (ancestry), military status (past, present or future), disability, age (40 years or older), status as a parent during pregnancy and immediately after the birth of a child, status as a parent of a young child, status as a foster parent, genetic information, or sexual orientation, 


Standard NCSC Course Policies
Important information regarding College Procedures and Policies can be found on the syllabus supplement located at this link

 

 





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